Remaindered Links for 16 Feb 2007

How to Dance by Ze Frank | For those of you about to bust loose, we salute you.

How Not To Talk To Your Kids | An interesting article on how too much praise—and more specifically, the wrong kind of praise—can adversly affect a child’s work ethic and performance in life. Remember. Process is everything. Effort, not the outcome is to be encouraged.

Ambient Signifiers | Ambient Signifiers are sonic differences that help travelers on the confusing Tokyo subway know where they are in the grand scheme of the system. This article at Boxes and Arrows discusses how low-frequency signifiers can have a huge impact on usability.

Vectorika | An online magazine all about vector art. Viva illustrator!

What to Eat to Combat Aging | Not exactly a fountain of youth, but some things to pay attention to as far as what you consume. Dad, you’ll be happy about #1 (sunflower seeds).

CSS3 Preview | See the new hotness of CSS 3, some of which already works in Firefox. (via Cameron Moll)

  1. Jeffro says:

    I feel the strange urge to get up and start...DANCING!!!!

  2. Alicia says:

    I don't really have an ansewr, but I do have a story related to names, identity, and of course, Japanese stuff. In Japan, I taught a class of first year high school students enrolled in a specialized English class. The teacher thought it'd be great to give them "English" names, so I came up with 40 English names for them. The results were mixed, some kids really embraced the idea of having an English name. The rest were the kids who preferred their real names or who were indifferent. At the English camp I helped plan, I encouraged all the students to go by their English names because I thought it would encourage an "English" mentality. However, my volunteers who were from English speaking countries really did not want to call my students with the "English" names I gave them. The volunteers felt that knowing the real names of the students would make them feel a better connection with the students.So the dilemma was that I wanted the students to use their "English" names, but volunteers wanted to use the students' Japanese names. To me, I felt that using English names compared to the Japanese names wouldn't make much of a difference with identifying with the students. Am I right? Am I wrong? Well, when I get e-mails from my students they still seem to use their English names. Maybe they forgot that I actually know their Japanese names or maybe they actually like their English names better. Who knows?

  3. Alicia says:

    I don't really have an ansewr, but I do have a story related to names, identity, and of course, Japanese stuff. In Japan, I taught a class of first year high school students enrolled in a specialized English class. The teacher thought it'd be great to give them "English" names, so I came up with 40 English names for them. The results were mixed, some kids really embraced the idea of having an English name. The rest were the kids who preferred their real names or who were indifferent. At the English camp I helped plan, I encouraged all the students to go by their English names because I thought it would encourage an "English" mentality. However, my volunteers who were from English speaking countries really did not want to call my students with the "English" names I gave them. The volunteers felt that knowing the real names of the students would make them feel a better connection with the students.So the dilemma was that I wanted the students to use their "English" names, but volunteers wanted to use the students' Japanese names. To me, I felt that using English names compared to the Japanese names wouldn't make much of a difference with identifying with the students. Am I right? Am I wrong? Well, when I get e-mails from my students they still seem to use their English names. Maybe they forgot that I actually know their Japanese names or maybe they actually like their English names better. Who knows?

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